queen of your heart


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Jul 31, 2014
@ 3:14 pm
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leaveyourkeyinthemailb0x:

"im not a feminist"

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(via feminspire)


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Jul 31, 2014
@ 3:11 pm
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119,097 notes

desidere:

bellahugo:

ratchetmelancholy:

White privilege is your history being taught as a core class and mine being taught as an elective. 

please let them know.

white privilege is your history being taught as a core class, and mine being banned because it would promote "the overthrow of the U.S. government, foster racial resentment, and advocate ethnic solidarity."

(via violetsphinx)


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Jul 30, 2014
@ 1:08 pm
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(Source: pleasestopbeingsad, via feminspire)


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Jul 22, 2014
@ 9:56 pm
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10 notes

feministwomenofcolor:

You know, it really hurts that my (white) best friend from high school isn’t on the same page as me on feminism, race and white privilege. Instead, he calls me hateful of white people and talks over me. I have tried so many times to change his mind. Maybe I should just let him go?

life is too short for hypocritical alliances


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Jul 17, 2014
@ 3:37 pm
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277 notes

Stop paying superficial lip service to intersectionality, white feminists. It is insulting and strips the power from one of the most important concepts in the politics of gender liberation. If you can’t take a stand against racism you have no business calling yourself intersectional for feminist brownie points. I can’t listen to a white feminist who coos about her love of bell hooks but dismisses the words of a woman of colour she knows on the subject of race.

When will white feminists take collective responsibility for educating themselves? When will they understand the power at play that sings in their skins? We don’t exist in a vacuum and women of colour don’t exist to hold their hands and explain in painful detail why their behaviour continues to hurt us. Intersectional feminist politics are not for white women to co-opt as their own. It is explicitly a theory that was formed from the mind of a Black woman, Kimberlé Crenshaw, to explain Black women’s situations, as they were ignored by the white-centric feminist movement and simultaneously by the male-centric civil rights movement. I cannot speak for every Black woman, and I would never profess to. We are not a monolith. But I think we ought to stand wary of a white woman who calls herself intersectional. You won’t listen to us and you will exclude us from your movement but you will take the ideas you like?

Kesiena Boom for Autostraddle in this incredible essay, “It’s Time for White Feminists to Stop Talking About Solidarity and Start Acting” (via ranger-watson)

sheer gold.  round of applause.  some favorite quotes:

Use your voice as a privileged white woman to shout down racism wherever you see it. Be thankful that you will never know the sickening lurch that sways through your blood when your humanity is denounced and denied because of your race by women who profess to care about all women’s liberation. The title feminist is to be taken up by women who have moved beyond a selfish view of one’s relationship to society, an outlook that is nurtured and encouraged by the neo-liberal matrix we find ourselves struggling to survive in.”

White women must stand beside, not in front of us and force themselves to think about who exactly their feminism is fighting for.

(via oxfordcommas)


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Jul 15, 2014
@ 7:32 pm
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32 notes

thefeministpress:

Last week I had the privilege of sitting down with FP’s newest staff member, Jisu Kim, our marketing and sales associate. Jisu moved to Oklahoma from Korea when she was 3 and finished high school at an international school in Korea. She was a Feminist Press intern in 2012 while attending Sarah Lawrence in Bronxville, where she studied literature and political theory, and joined the staff full-time just this summer.
 Although it may seem obvious that a Feminist Press employee would consider herself a feminist, Jisu’s understanding of feminism changed a lot as she moved out of the South, attended Sarah Lawrence, and started working with the Feminist Press. In high school, Jisu didn’t think of herself as a feminist because feminism seemed like “something that white girls do”. Instead, she experienced racial and ethnic inequality as a larger force than gender inequality in her own life.
 “I just sort of didn’t care about sexual or gender politics or anything like that for a long time because… race was something that affected my life much more than considering myself a woman,” she told me. “That was really overshadowed by the fact that I was Korean and I came from an immigrant family.”
 Jisu’s view of feminism has evolved since her high school days to include subversive communication and thought that is relevant to her experience.
 “Now I have an extremely expansive view of feminism,” she said. “To me, my interest in issues of gender and gender inequality make me a feminist, but also, I think that feminism is about subverting the patriarchal and historically dominant way of doing things and assigning value to things… [Reexamining] the values we have, like publishing things on the Internet… might not automatically be feminist in itself, but I think Internet publishing or new media have the potential to be feminist and subversive because it’s sidestepping the entrenched way of producing literature. So now I think of feminism as ‘what if we weren’t so obsessed with domination, mastery, or the kind of cold rationality that disallows for ambiguity or non-binary voices?’”
 Even the way Jisu dresses challenges conventional ideas of what a young professional woman should look like. One thing that struck me when I met Jisu is her unique style. She credits “not fitting in” as what pushed her to assemble weird ensembles.
 Not everyone, however, found her outfits appealing. “When I was like 12 or 14, I became really obsessed with the idea of thrifting, but I certainly didn’t do it well. My mother told me, ‘You know, just because it’s interesting doesn’t mean you look good.’” With respect to Jisu’s mom, we at FP think Jisu always looks great. More importantly, her approach to feminist publishing brings intelligence, fun, and a fresh perspective to the office whether she’s sharing her ideas at an editorial meeting or just helping an intern package an outgoing order.
 You can follow Jisu on twitter @nophonejisu.
~ FP intern Mariya

this hit home on a lot of levels

thefeministpress:

Last week I had the privilege of sitting down with FP’s newest staff member, Jisu Kim, our marketing and sales associate. Jisu moved to Oklahoma from Korea when she was 3 and finished high school at an international school in Korea. She was a Feminist Press intern in 2012 while attending Sarah Lawrence in Bronxville, where she studied literature and political theory, and joined the staff full-time just this summer.


Although it may seem obvious that a Feminist Press employee would consider herself a feminist, Jisu’s understanding of feminism changed a lot as she moved out of the South, attended Sarah Lawrence, and started working with the Feminist Press. In high school, Jisu didn’t think of herself as a feminist because feminism seemed like “something that white girls do”. Instead, she experienced racial and ethnic inequality as a larger force than gender inequality in her own life.


“I just sort of didn’t care about sexual or gender politics or anything like that for a long time because… race was something that affected my life much more than considering myself a woman,” she told me. “That was really overshadowed by the fact that I was Korean and I came from an immigrant family.”


Jisu’s view of feminism has evolved since her high school days to include subversive communication and thought that is relevant to her experience.


“Now I have an extremely expansive view of feminism,” she said. “To me, my interest in issues of gender and gender inequality make me a feminist, but also, I think that feminism is about subverting the patriarchal and historically dominant way of doing things and assigning value to things… [Reexamining] the values we have, like publishing things on the Internet… might not automatically be feminist in itself, but I think Internet publishing or new media have the potential to be feminist and subversive because it’s sidestepping the entrenched way of producing literature. So now I think of feminism as ‘what if we weren’t so obsessed with domination, mastery, or the kind of cold rationality that disallows for ambiguity or non-binary voices?’”


Even the way Jisu dresses challenges conventional ideas of what a young professional woman should look like. One thing that struck me when I met Jisu is her unique style. She credits “not fitting in” as what pushed her to assemble weird ensembles.


Not everyone, however, found her outfits appealing.
“When I was like 12 or 14, I became really obsessed with the idea of thrifting, but I certainly didn’t do it well. My mother told me, ‘You know, just because it’s interesting doesn’t mean you look good.’”
With respect to Jisu’s mom, we at FP think Jisu always looks great. More importantly, her approach to feminist publishing brings intelligence, fun, and a fresh perspective to the office whether she’s sharing her ideas at an editorial meeting or just helping an intern package an outgoing order.


You can follow Jisu on twitter @nophonejisu.

~ FP intern Mariya

this hit home on a lot of levels


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Jul 15, 2014
@ 1:04 pm
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582 notes

gallowhill:

Krzysztof Wodiczko, Ægis, 2000

gallowhill:

Krzysztof Wodiczko, Ægis, 2000


Photoset

Jul 15, 2014
@ 12:48 pm
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79,733 notes

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.

Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.

Oh, and by the way…

Tudor:

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Elizabethan:

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Stuart:

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Georgian:

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Regency:

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Victorian:

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Edwardian:

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Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

owned

(via themindofaconservator)


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Jul 14, 2014
@ 1:32 pm
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Black Herstory: The Founders of the Feminist Party »

I was doing some feminist research at work about feminist parties and came across this.  you’re welcome.


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Jul 14, 2014
@ 1:32 pm
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4 notes

i decided i want to get a joint master’s degree (in addition to library/archives) in women’s history because my life is about my commitment to dismantling capitalism/patriarchy/racism